Heart Deaths To Skyrocket – New Report Horrifies Doctors

The American Heart Association (AHA) estimates that in the next 30 years, at least six out of ten elderly Americans may have heart disease.

On June 4, the group posted the news on its website. The AHA went on:

“According to two American Heart Association presidential advisories published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation on Tuesday, the predicted rise in heart disease and stroke, along with several important risk factors such as obesity and high blood pressure, is likely to triple costs to $1.8 trillion by 2050. “While one study forecasts the overall expenditures associated with cardiovascular disease, the other examines the expected rise in disease rates in the coming decades.”

Vice-chair of the advisory writing group, Dr. Dhruv S. Kazi, stated in a news release that “a near-perfect storm is arriving in the landscape of cardiovascular disease in the U.S.””

He also mentioned the rise in cardiovascular risk factors over the last ten years, which include obesity, diabetes, and uncontrolled high blood pressure. These factors heighten a person’s risk of stroke and heart disease.

He went on, “It is not surprising that there will be a significant economic cost associated with a tremendous increase in cardiovascular risk factors and diseases.”

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are various forms of heart disease, and one can prevent or treat some of them by leading a healthy lifestyle.

And in July 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that heart disease was the country’s top cause of death.

According to the news report, heart disease claims the lives of over 647,000 Americans annually and affects both men and women, as well as members of the majority of racial and ethnic groups in the country.

An extensive study revealed in February that taking too much of the B vitamin niacin may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to UPI.

Author: Scott Dowdy

Most Popular

These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

To learn how you can use Content.ad to drive visitors to your content or add this service to your site, please contact us at [email protected].

Family-Friendly Content

Website owners select the type of content that appears in our units. However, if you would like to ensure that Content.ad always displays family-friendly content on this device, regardless of what site you are on, check the option below. Learn More



Most Popular
Sponsored Content

These content links are provided by Content.ad. Both Content.ad and the web site upon which the links are displayed may receive compensation when readers click on these links. Some of the content you are redirected to may be sponsored content. View our privacy policy here.

To learn how you can use Content.ad to drive visitors to your content or add this service to your site, please contact us at [email protected].

Family-Friendly Content

Website owners select the type of content that appears in our units. However, if you would like to ensure that Content.ad always displays family-friendly content on this device, regardless of what site you are on, check the option below. Learn More